Sage

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Herbs
   
     

 

Sage
Salvia Officinalis

A common garden plant. The volatile oils soothes the mucous membranes of the mouth and throat. Great for sore throats and laryngitis. It has also been used as an ingredient in toothpaste.

Originally from the Mediterranean region but now widely grown. Sage grows well under the sun, well-drained soil. Itis easily grown in pots and window boxes.

 

 

   

Ads a culinary herb, sage has a tangy, citrus flavour with a minty aftertaste. Ideal for creamy soups, meat gravies or sauces. But do not use too much, as it will give off a musty taste. Commonly used in the traditional roast turkey stuffing. Sage is also reputed to have healing properties and is used to relieve eye infections.

Actions
Stimulant
Astringent
Antiseptic
Antispasmodic
Carminative
Bitter tonic

Indications (internal use)
Sore throat
Mouth sores
Mouth ulcers
Gum disease
Tonsilitis
Weak apetite
Flatulence
Excessive sweating, night sweats
Menopausal hot flushes.
Infertility

Indications (external use)
Cleansing infected wounds and ulcers.

Method and dose
As a tea infusion.
As a strong tea, can be used as a rinse to darken hair.
Used in cooking with rich, fatty meats (eg. pork, goose).

For mouth and throat problems, make a strong tea and use it as a gargle and mouthwash.

Caution
Sage must not be used in pregnancy. Do not use while breastfeeding because it tends to dry up breast milk.


 

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